6 Ways Companies Could Be Exploiting Employees on the Autism Spectrum

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5. Workplace Harassment and Discrimination

The pressure to be able to solve difficult math problems in their head or memorize a photograph is the least of an autistic person’s worries if they’re being outright bullied or discriminated against in the workplace. They may be fired or turned down for promotions or other opportunities because of their disorder, or they may find that colleagues mock or exclude them. These forms of harassment and discrimination may be blunt and easy to find, such as rude remarks, jokes, rumors, and even physical abuse. Or they may be more subtle, such as overbearing supervision, constant critiques of the person’s work, and unfairly difficult deadlines.

6. Other forms of exploitation

When an employee has limited work experience and limited understanding of social nuances, there’s no telling what other forms exploitation in the workplace may take.

More than a third of autistic adults report being bullied or discriminated against at work, and over 40 percent have left or lost their job due to autism-related discrimination.

If you believe a company has been exploiting you or someone you know who has autism, don’t hesitate to speak up. Everyone on this planet has value and deserves to be treated fairly.


Have you experienced workplace discrimination or exploitation because of autism? We want to hear your story in the comments!

McDonald’s Allegedly Fires Employee with Autism for the Most Ridiculous Reason: Click “Next” below!

Elizabeth Nelson is a wordsmith, an alumna of Aquinas College in Grand Rapids, a four-leaf-clover finder, and a grammar connoisseur. She has lived in west Michigan since age four but loves to travel to new (and old) places. In her free time, she. . . wait, what’s free time?
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