Coffee Barista Studies Sign Language to Make a Deaf Customer Feel More Welcome

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Getting a coffee with someone is a great way to create a tiny connection or start a relationship with them, but it’s not often that that connection occurs between a customer and their barista.

However, that’s exactly what happened when a barista went out of her way to make sure one particular customer felt more comfortable at the coffee shop that she frequented. Krystal Payne reached out to help her deaf customer, who she noticed always struggled to place his order with non-deaf and non-sign-language-speaking baristas.

Photo: YouTube/CBS Evening News

The customer, Ibby Piracha, was surprised and touched when Payne used sign language to ask him what he wanted.

Photo: YouTube/CBS Evening News

Krystal already had a background in American Sign Language (ASL) but studied YouTube and other videos to add more words to her vocabulary. She wanted to know all the words typically used in a coffee shop in order to make Ibby feel welcome and to make the order-placing process as easy as possible for him.

Not only that, she handed him a lovely note, which read, “I’ve been learning ASL just so you can have the same experience as everyone else.” Ibby was so touched that he framed the note. And we’re sure he will continue to frequent this coffee shop for years to come now that he knows there’s someone there who cares enough to learn his language and make him feel at home.

Photo: YouTube/CBS Evening News

Sometimes, it’s the little things that can really bridge a communication gap. Take a moment to consider today: what little things have done it for you?

Photo: YouTube/CBS Evening News

Check out the video below to learn more about the unique relationship between Krystal and her favorite customer, Ibby.

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