This Autistic Man Once Struggled To Hold A Pen — Now He Creates Art That Raises Autism Awareness

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You’d never know it by looking at his amazing drawings today, but when he was younger, D.J. Svoboda could barely grasp a pen. It’s common for young people with autism to struggle with fine motor skills, but it creates more problems, such as poor school performance and a feeling of being different from one’s peers. D.J. also struggled with feelings of isolation brought on by his autism. Things just weren’t going right for him at all.

However, things started to turn around for him in middle school when he discovered art. Thanks to a teacher who thought art class might help improve D.J.’s fine motor skills, D.J. slowly learned how to hold writing implements, actually write words, and make beautiful art. That last part might just be the icing on the cake, but it has helped D.J. feel like he has a place to fit in in the world, which is a huge accomplishment.

Photo: ABC 11 News

Today, D.J. Svoboda raises awareness of issues related to autism and bullying with his greeting cards, calendars, and books. They all feature colorful characters that he calls the “Imagifriends.” And they’re all pretty awesome.

Photo: ABC 11 News

“When I do the art, I can picture them helping the world to understand more about autism, to understand that everybody is special the way they are, because the inside of a person is what matters the most,” says D.J..

Would you be interested in owning a piece of D.J.’s artwork? We think it’s pretty great! Take a look at this video to see just how amazing this budding young artist is.

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Congratulations, D.J., on finding your place in the world! You deserve every bit of recognition you get for your fantastic drawings!

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The Autism Site is a place where people can come together to support people who are affected by autism spectrum disorder. In addition to sharing inspiring stories, shopping for the cause, and signing petitions, visitors can take just a moment each day to click on the red button to provide therapy for children and families living with autism spectrum disorders. Visit The Autism Site and click today - it's free!
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